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Time 100 Gala - Thursday, 5/1/2014 1:39 PM

Backdropped by a cinematically slickened Central Park South, the Time Warner Center rolled out the red carpet for its namesake’s annual gala of international influencers and impresarios: The Time 100 Gala, Time’s Most Influential People in the World.

Punctuated by rousing performances from Pharrell Williams, Carrie Underwood and Late Night’s Seth Meyers, the damp weather could not affect an otherwise memorable evening radiating with stars, dignitaries and visionaries alike; and buzzing around the gala with Patrick McMullan, this little fly on the wall caught many a moment.

The gala kicked off, appropriately, with the step-and-repeat photo ops, where poised for the press were the always stunning (and dashing) Amy Adams, Christy Turlington Burns, Edward Burns, Katie Couric, Frank Ocean, Susan Sarandon, Padma Lakshmi, Diane Paulus, Georgina Chapman and Gov. Scott Walker; while many listees from the less chased fields were charmingly awestruck with the pomp and parade – activist (and upcoming PMc Magazine interviewee) Withelma ‘T’ Ortiz Walker Pettigrew whispering to us this was the first time she’s worn a dress.

Overseen, pre presentation, among the dining room buzz was Martha Stewart playing party shutterbug, snapping away photos with friends, along with the first meeting of Oscar Winner Amy Adams and producer Harvey Weinstein; which comes as shocking considering his omnipresent award-hawk reputation and her recent flush of awards. Is one perhaps avoiding the other?...

Seth Meyers entertained the dinner crowd with his sharp wit, focusing in on fellow, though absent, honorees Beyoncé, Hillary Clinton, President Obama and Vladimir Putin among others. Unable to escape Meyer’s mordancy was even Al Qaida leader Abu Du’a, “Despite making the list, Abu D’Ua chose not to attend. Although I have to admit it was a pretty good plan on how to catch him.”

One of today’s hottest acts, Pharrell Williams, followed Meyers with a wildly immersive performance of his smash hits ‘Get Lucky’, ‘Come Get It Bea’ and the ubiquitous ‘Happy’. The three song set had everyone in the four tiered room moving, bespelling tapping toes in even the firmest feet.

But despite all the fun had, there were moments of serious reflection as well. Uganda’s Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe gripped the room with her powerful voice; speaking of her efforts at her Saint Monica Girls’ Tailoring Center rekindling hope in girls victimized by violence, rape and sexual exploitation. Met with ovation, she implored every ear to, “start with one woman, one child at a time.”

Oscar winning Director of Gravity, Alfonso Cuar­ón, shared an equally inspiring outlook, that, like him, all fellow honorees, “believe in making a better world than the one given to us.” When speaking though, he appeared a little uneasy. Perhaps he dislikes public speaking… or it was that Cosmos host Neil deGrasse Tyson, whom light-heartedly tweeted the many inaccuracies in Gravity, was seated one table over.

Introduced by Fox NewsMegyn Kelly, country songstress Carrie Underwood closed the show with an emphatic performance of songs both new and old, belting six tunes including ‘Good girl’, ‘Jesus, Take the Wheel’ and ‘Two Black Cadillacs’. Although New York isn’t really her market, she is particularly enjoyable live compared to radio and visibly changed a several cynical ears into appreciators.

The gala retired into the cocktail room where sighted was Ronan Farrow keeping up on the dance floor with Orange Is The New Black’s Laverne Cox and Uzo Aduba. Patrick McMullan also went to task chatting, connecting, and snapping away; even trading his camera in for a few Instagram, or as he puts it, fauxtography requests for Katie Couric, Arianna Huffington and a few select others.

Some McMullan pairings of pride were his introduction of billionaires David Koch and Rupert Murdoch to Sister Rosemary, hopefully catalyzing some involvement into her girls’ center; and Nest LabsTony Fadell to Harvard Astrophysicist, and Big Bang Theory validator, Dr. John Kovac, whom endlessly chatted of things surely beyond many’s comprehension.